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Live from Abu Dhabi Connect the World takes you on a journey across continents, investigating the stories that are changing our world.

Live from Abu Dhabi Connect the World takes you on a journey across continents, investigating the stories that are changing our world.

Does rock and roll mix with Islam?

February 3rd, 2010
05:12 PM ET

You wouldn't think that rock and roll music would be a good fit with the Islamic faith, but 30 million records say otherwise.

Salman Ahmad is the lead singer and founding member of Junoon.

Salman Ahmad is the lead singer and founding member of Junoon.

Salman Ahmad is the lead singer and founding member of one of South Asia's biggest rock bands - "Junoon" - and can count big name celebrities like Al Gore and Bono as fans.

Ahmad is renowned for being the first rock and roll musician from the region that has torn down barriers between the west and the Muslim world.

The rise of "Junoon" wasn't an easy task - the creation of the group came at a time when angry mullahs wanted music to be banned from the Islamic Republic of Pakistan.

Today though, the band has become the U2 of Asia and the group has already sold a record number of albums across the region.

Ahmad has been a UNAIDS Goodwill ambassador since 2005 and and has been helping to raise awareness to reverse the spread of AIDS through his music.

His new book is called "Rock & Roll Jihad: A Muslim Rock Star's Revolution" and he has just performed at the United Nations.

Here's your chance to ask this inspirational musician your questions.

Do you think that rock and roll music can mix with the Muslim culture? Does it cause too much tension or can it help bridge a gap between the west and Islam? Maybe you want to know who his idols were growing up?

Please post your questions below.

Has autism affected your life?

February 3rd, 2010
01:02 PM ET

(CNN) The medical journal, The Lancet, on Tuesday retracted a controversial 1998 paper that linked the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine to autism.

Dr. Andrew Wakefield was the lead author of the study.

Dr. Andrew Wakefield was the lead author of the study.

The study subsequently had been discredited, and last week, the lead author, Dr. Andrew Wakefield, was found to have acted unethically in conducting the research.

The General Medical Council, which oversees doctors in Britain, said that "there was a biased selection of patients in The Lancet paper" and that his "conduct in this regard was dishonest and irresponsible."

The panel found that Wakefield subjected some children in the study to various invasive medical procedures such as colonoscopies and MRI scans.

He also paid children at his son's birthday party to have blood drawn for research purposes, an act that "showed a callous disregard" for the "distress and pain" of the children, the panel said.

The issue has become a huge debate within the medical community and among parents with young children.

Many parents avoided giving their children vaccines because of this study over the past decade.

We want to know what you think.

Has autism touched your life? Did you change the way you vaccinated your children because of this study? What are your thoughts on this emotional issue?

Please leave your comments below.


Filed under:  General