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Live from Abu Dhabi Connect the World takes you on a journey across continents, investigating the stories that are changing our world.

Live from Abu Dhabi Connect the World takes you on a journey across continents, investigating the stories that are changing our world.

Six degrees: Donald Trump to Michael Phelps

February 10th, 2010
02:37 PM ET

It's time to hand down this week's Six Degrees of Separation Challenge.

Donald Trump and Michael Phelps.

Donald Trump and Michael Phelps.

We've chosen two of our Connectors of the Day for you to try and connect - in just six steps.

First up, U.S. business magnate, and star of "The Apprentice" Donald Trump.

We want you to connect him to super-swimmer Michael Phelps, who has won 14 Olympic gold medals and broken a staggering 37 world records.

Remember, to play the game, you need to come up with five people between those two – for a total of six links.

For your chance to win, please leave your answers below.

Thursday's Connector: Sanjay Gupta

February 10th, 2010
02:34 PM ET

Dr. Sanjay Gupta is the chief medical correspondent for CNN and is also a practicing neurosurgeon who regularly takes part in life saving surgeries.

CNN's Sanjay Gupta.

CNN's Sanjay Gupta.

Before joining CNN, Gupta served at the University of Tennessee's Semmes-Murphy clinic and the University of Michigan Medical Center.

In 1997, he was selected as a White House Fellow, serving as a special advisor to First Lady Hillary Clinton.

Gupta joined CNN in the summer of 2001 and has reported in important events including the anthrax attacks in the U.S. and the invasion of Iraq.

Over the past four weeks, Gupta has been in Haiti covering the devastation caused by an earthquake that claimed more than 200,000 lives.

Gupta has been reporting from the field as a journalist as well as acting as a doctor in certain situations which has made him the only practicing doctor and journalist in the country.

This has raised serious questions over whether it's possible for him to properly do both.

Many critics believe that journalists should not get involved in the story and should only report what is taking place.

In the case of Gupta, he has actively been part of the story - performing a number of life-saving surgeries to injured Haitians as well as heading up an emergency medical clinic for victims - all while being filmed for the news.

We want to know what you think? What boundaries should journalists follow? Should Gupta be made part of the story? Can he do both professions justice?