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Live from Abu Dhabi Connect the World takes you on a journey across continents, investigating the stories that are changing our world.

Live from Abu Dhabi Connect the World takes you on a journey across continents, investigating the stories that are changing our world.

Have your questions on Egyptian crisis answered

January 31st, 2011
01:34 PM ET

It has been nearly a week since protests first erupted in cities across Egypt as people showed their anger and frustration with the Mubarak government.

Tens of thousands of Egyptians have taken to the streets each day, plunging the country into a political crisis.

The army was called onto the streets of Cairo in a bid to restore calm on Friday evening - a move that hasn't happened in decades.

While President Mubarak sacked his entire government on Saturday night, protestors were still not satisfied with that action - their primary demand is for Mubarak to resign.

As the crisis in Egypt continues, this is your chance to have your questions answered by an expert.

Do you want to know what would happen next? Who is in control? Would elections happen immediately if Mubarak resigned? What happens constitutionally?

Please leave all your questions on Egypt below and be sure to tune into Connect the World tonight at 2100 GMT to see them answered.

Best viral videos of the week

January 31st, 2011
12:01 PM ET

Future Connector – Dambisa Moyo

January 31st, 2011
11:50 AM ET

In the last two years Dambisa Moyo has gone from a relatively unknown academic to one of the most controversial thinkers of our time.

The Zambian-born economist  first came to the world's attention with the publication with of her bestselling book "Dead Aid: Why Aid is Not Working and How there is a Better Way for Africa." In it, she attacks the process of foreign aid by explaining that it's ineffective.

In 2009 Time Magazine listed her as one of the "100 most Influential People in the World." And this month she's out with her second book entitled "How the West Was Lost: Fifty Years of Economic Folly – and the Stark Choices Ahead" in which she talks about the inevitable decline of the West and the forces that brought it there.

Here's your chance to ask Dambisa Moyo your questions. Do you agree with her assessment of aid? of the West's future?

Send in your questions and don't forget to tell us where you're writing from.