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Live from Abu Dhabi Connect the World takes you on a journey across continents, investigating the stories that are changing our world.

Live from Abu Dhabi Connect the World takes you on a journey across continents, investigating the stories that are changing our world.

Drive Another Day: Bond’s classic cars

March 19th, 2014
03:40 PM ET

He's famed for his 'licence to kill', rather than his 'licence to drive', but Britain's most famous spy has driven an incredible assortment of cars.

Becky visited the London Film Museum's 'Bond in Motion', the largest exhibition of James Bond vehicles, gadgets and gizmos to date.

From Alfa Romeos to Aston Martins, these vehicles have survived through some trying times. Even though special effects have improved over Bond's lifespan, the scenes in the modern films are no less dangerous. Vic Armstrong – former Bond stuntman and stunt coordinator – told Becky that there's no "under-cranking" in the films: everything happens at the speed you see it at.

Becky also spoke to Michael G. Wilson, producer and screenwriter, who says he knows what fans of the franchise really care about. "I think people, when they ask what the next film is they say 'who's the girl and what car does Bond drive?"


Filed under:  Becky's Interviews • Celebrity • Entertainment • Hollywood • London • Technology • Video

Did Pastor promote homophobia in Uganda?

February 26th, 2014
02:17 PM ET

Earlier this week, Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni signed a bill into law, introducing life imprisonment for those who engage in "aggravated homosexuality."  Just one day later, a tabloid newspaper in Uganda published a list of the country's "top 200 homosexuals."  Surveys show that 96% of the Ugandan public says society should not be accepting of homosexuality.

But where has this anti-gay sentiment in Uganda come from?  One source may be that of American evangelical Christians, who have assumed a growing influence in the country and advocated against gay lifestyles.

One of the most well known is American pastor and lawyer Scott Lively.  Becky spoke with him about his missionary work on Connect the World.  She began by asking Lively for his reaction to the new law in Uganda.

"I have mixed feelings about that," Lively said.  "I support parts of it, the parts that have increased penalties for homosexual abuse of children and intentionally spreading AIDS through sodomy.  But the parts dealing with simple homosexuality I don't agree with.  They're far too harsh."

Lively said that Ugandan culture and history itself was the main source of the anti-gay sentiment seen there.  "No American evangelicals taught the Ugandans how to be against homosexuality," he said.

When asked whether he was an extremist, Lively replied that "an extremist is in the eye of the beholder."


Filed under:  Activism • Africa • Analysis • Becky's Interviews • Global Connections • London • Religion • United States • Video

Ukrainian politics remain in flux

February 26th, 2014
01:32 PM ET

While the world waits to see how the political uncertainty in Ukraine will play out, Becky spoke with Ian Bremmer about the possible outcomes.  Bremmer is the President of Eurasia Group, a political risk consultancy.

Becky asked Bremmer about the ongoing influence of Russia in determining Ukraine's future.  He said it remains strong, despite the recent ouster of Kremlin-friendly leader Viktor Yanukovych.

"You and I are talking about Ukraine today," Bremmer said.  "In six months, we won't be, but the Russians will still be there and their ability to close this place down to everybody but Russia is pretty significant."

With unrest festering in eastern regions of Ukraine, Becky and Bremmer also discussed the possibility of separation within the country.  He said it's not very plausible in the near term, but could be a concern in the medium term – especially as international actors are likely to grow weary of Ukraine's new leadership.

"There's a reason why the Europeans and the Americans didn't bother to give these guys any money until after a hundred Ukrainians were dead," Bremmer said.  "And it's because they were saying 'we don't want to work with these folks, they're not going to reform, they're not going to engage.'  That doesn't change miraculously just because they've been in the news for a week."


Filed under:  Analysis • Becky's Interviews • Economy • Europe • London • Ukraine • Video

'12 Years' a game changer for diversity

February 18th, 2014
01:45 PM ET

As '12 Years a Slave' took top honors at the BAFTA Awards, all eyes were on the film's black cast – and especially director Steve McQueen.  If he wins the Best Director prize at next month's Academy Awards, McQueen will become the first black director ever to win.

Atika Shubert spoke with John Akomfrah, a Former Governor of the British Film Institute.  She asked him what McQueen's BAFTA win meant for diversity in the film industry.

"I think Steve winning is confirmation of a trend taking place anyway," Akomfrah said.  "And by that I mean, for instance, 12 years ago, if you had a film called '12 Years a Slave,' the idea would be that it would go to a white director because it's big and so it's appropriate that it should go to a white director.  The fact that a major African diaspora story is done by a black director of black British heritage and descent is, I think, significant."

Atika also asked what Akomfrah would consider to be a true sign of diversity in cinema.

"If Steve's example became a trend, so that there were more people like Steve," he replied.  "If a range of black acting talent continues to be both affirmed and endorsed by both BAFTA and the Academy."


Filed under:  Analysis • Celebrity • Entertainment • History • Hollywood • London • Oscars • Video

Is Matteo Renzi ready to be Italian PM?

February 14th, 2014
01:45 PM ET

There's fresh political uncertainty in Italy, with the resignation of Italian Prime Minister Enrico Letta after less than a year in office.

The current front-runner to replace Letta is Democratic Party leader Matteo Renzi, a young political star who won his party's primary a couple of months ago.

Max Foster spoke with Paola Subacchi, Research Director of International Economics at Chatham House, about the political upheaval in Italy.  He asked her about Renzi's appeal as  a potential leader, despite his relative lack of experience.

"The country seems to like him because he's young, because he's energetic and because there is this untested assumption that somebody new and young and energetic could really change the country's fate," Subacchi said.

She acknowledged that there are reservations within Italy about Renzi's lack of experience in parliament, government and within the European Union.  "It doesn't give the country the confidence it needs in the institutions and in the political debate," Subacchi said.  "There's still a big if about whether or not he will become the Prime Minister of Italy."

 

 


Filed under:  Analysis • Europe • Italy • London
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