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Live from Abu Dhabi Connect the World takes you on a journey across continents, investigating the stories that are changing our world.

What do you want to know about swine flu?

July 15th, 2009
12:32 PM ET

The reality is now setting in that the current outbreaks of H1N1 or "swine flu" is not just any flu but a pandemic that is spreading rapidly. What's really worrying the authorities is that in many affected countries, "flu season" is just around the corner - so we are yet to see the worst of it.

[cnn-photo-caption image= http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2009/images/07/15/art.thailand.swine.flu.afp.gi.jpg
caption="Thai women wear masks as they sit waiting to have a medical check-up at a hospital in Narthiwat Tuesday."]
The logistics of the pandemic – how many people have been infected, which age groups have been worse hit – are one thing. The other is the message itself. Governments and health authorities don't want to scare people unnecessarily about the risks - but they don't want people to be complacent either.

This point has been summed up by a debate here in the UK. Parents have been told that we are in the early stages of pandemic and that the current form of swine flu is relatively mild and can usually be treated successfully with anti-virals, of which the UK is well-stocked.

But that has prompted some parents to consider exposing their children to the virus now, before it mutates into something more threatening, even organizing "swine flu parties" at which youngsters can catch H1N1. It is something UK health authorities have strongly advised against – but it has left parents feeling that they are receiving conflicting advice about the seriousness of the threat.

The problem is that the right advice for each individual relies on that individual's circumstances – where you live, how you live, who you live around and how well prepared your healthcare system is.

Connects, as always, values your responses and comments. Thanks to those of you who have taken the time to send us your opinions, we really enjoy reading your thoughts and using them on the programme.

That's why we are asking you today what you want to know about H1N1. We'll be putting your questions to a preeminent doctor and expert in the subject who will try to answer your queries. Whatever question you have, whether it’s on the nature of the virus or how best to protect your children, please send them below for today's edition of Connect the World.

Post your questions below or e-mail me on connecttheworld@CNN.com

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Filed under:  General