Tune in at 16:00 London, 19:00 UAE

Live from Abu Dhabi Connect the World takes you on a journey across continents, investigating the stories that are changing our world.

Live from Abu Dhabi Connect the World takes you on a journey across continents, investigating the stories that are changing our world.

Are you a winner in the dating game?

September 7th, 2009
08:44 PM ET

From Tokyo to New York, hooking up with the perfect partner has never been more important –- especially in times of financial crisis.

As economies around the world struggle out of the red, so singles realize its best to find another half with whom to share costs. No one wants to end up with a bad match -– and a split that could hit them financially as well as emotionally. Tell us how you are coping romantically during the downturn.

Now marriage-hunting agencies are finding a steady stream of men and women who want to meet the perfect partner.

"In Japan, it is hard to build a relationship with people you don't know," explains instructor Takashi Tomita in Tokyo. "We do have parties but only with people you already know."

Agencies offer classes for men in how to stay relaxed when they meet women. "My shoulders tighten up and I can't talk with them," explained one man who said he would rather not give his name.

Meanwhile women learn about makeup and choosing the best colors for their wedding dress.

It's obvious that the world needs advice on all things romantic. Tonight on Connect The World relationships expert Samantha Daniels, who claims to have helped more than 100 happy couples get married, plays Cupid and offers her guidance and advice on how to find the perfect partner.

Romantic life been hit by the recession? Have you been involved in any dating disasters?

Or do you know how to find the perfect match? Would you benefit from tips for that all-important first meet?

Send your comments and we will use some of them in the show.

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Filed under:  General

Comment: Was Hitler to blame for World War II?

September 7th, 2009
04:07 PM ET
History lays the blame for World War II firmly on Adolf Hitler. (Photo: AFP/Getty Images)
History lays the blame for World War II firmly on Adolf Hitler. (Photo: AFP/Getty Images)

History is the propaganda of the victors. Accordingly, Germany's Adolf Hitler has been assigned total blame for starting World War II in Europe, history's deadliest conflict in which 50 million died.

Interestingly, the 70th anniversary of World War II has reopened old wounds and ignited an ugly battle of words between Russia and its unloving neighbors, Ukraine, Poland, and the Baltic states. The latter two accuse Moscow of having stabbed them in the back in 1939 by becoming a partner with Nazi Germany.

The parliamentary assembly of Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe recently held the USSR and Germany `equally responsible for World War II.’ After 70 years, it’s about time.

`A flat-out lie,’ angrily retorted Russia’s president, Dimitry Medvedev. The war cost the Soviet Union 25 million dead. Russians are quite right in believing that they, not the US and British Empire, defeated Hitler’s Germany. Russians fought with incredible heroism, suffered unthinkably casualties and damage, and ground Nazi Germany into dust. The Allies played an important but comparatively far less important role in Europe against an already defeated and ruined Germany.

Underlining Moscow’s worrying rehabilitation of Stalin, Medvedev claims the Soviet dictator saved Europe from Hitler and rejects all attempts to equate him with Hitler.

But the facts say differently. Stalin was an even worse mass murderer than Hitler by a factor of three or four. Stalin was also a much cleverer strategist, war leader and diplomat than Hitler, who stumbled into a war that Germany could not possibly win and for which it was woefully unprepared.

Click here to read the rest of this article on Eric Margolis' Web site.

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Filed under:  General

Sudan trouser trial: What's your view?

September 7th, 2009
09:36 AM ET
Al-Hussein faced up to 40 lashes for wearing pants considered too tight and a blouse deemed too sheer (PHOTO: AFP/GETTY IMAGES.)
Al-Hussein faced up to 40 lashes for wearing pants considered too tight and a blouse deemed too sheer (PHOTO: AFP/GETTY IMAGES.)

The trial has taken place in Sudan of a woman accused of wearing trousers which were "too tight," and a blouse that was too transparent.

Lubna al-Hussein, an employee of the media department of the United Nations in Sudan, resigned her position to deliberately lose immunity and go to trial. She was fined by the court, but will not get the 40 lashes she could potentially have faced. Her lawyer says she will appeal against the decision.

She does not intend to pay the fine, which means she will be jailed for a month, her lawyer says.

On Connect the World we discussed the case with Ayaan Hirsi Ali, the internationally known campaigner against the oppression of women in Muslin society. Hirsi Ali is a former Dutch MP, and for her campaigning and writing was named by Time magazine as one of the 100 most influential people of 2005. You can watch the interview here: