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Live from Abu Dhabi Connect the World takes you on a journey across continents, investigating the stories that are changing our world.

Live from Abu Dhabi Connect the World takes you on a journey across continents, investigating the stories that are changing our world.

Preparing for the worst

September 29th, 2009
06:47 PM ET

(CNN) - After lashing the Philippines for several days, Typhoon Ketsana has now turned its focus on Vietnam.

Filipino pedestrians in Quezon City, a suburb of Manila, brave Tropical Storm Ketsana's floodwaters.

Filipino pedestrians in Quezon City, a suburb of Manila, brave Tropical Storm Ketsana's floodwaters.

Ketsana left at least 246 people dead as it passed over the Philippines. Another 38 people are still missing, according to the nation's National Disaster Coordinating Council.

Nearly two million people have been affected by the killer storm and 567,000 people had been evacuated.

Read more about the story here.

Ketsana comes only weeks after the region was ravaged by another storm –- Typhoon Morakot – which claimed the lives of almost 400 people in Taiwan.

The island’s premiere Liu Chao-shiuan tendered his resignation after coming under fire for reacting slowly to the crisis. The storm triggered mudslides that wiped out entire villages in mountainous regions of southern Taiwan.

Now the Filipino government is trying to face down criticism it too was caught unprepared by a storm that left almost 80 percent of its capital, Manila, under water at one point on Sunday.

While there’s an obvious argument for greater preparedness in a region prone to tropical storms, the ferocity of the typhoons may indicate something altogether more difficult to legislate for – climate change.

Scientists around the globe are looking closely at all the evidence associated with global warming to come up with predictions for our future environment and weather.

They speculate over whether we're likely to see an increase in sea levels or an increase in flooding, and wonder what can be done to protect those most at risk.

Is it fair for the likes of  Taiwan and the Philippines to be criticized for their response to events possibly symptomatic of a problem we’re all responsible for?

Tell us what you think and we will use some of your comments in the show.


Filed under:  General