Tune in at 16:00 London, 19:00 UAE

Live from Abu Dhabi Connect the World takes you on a journey across continents, investigating the stories that are changing our world.

Live from Abu Dhabi Connect the World takes you on a journey across continents, investigating the stories that are changing our world.

Putting Olympic officials on ice

March 2nd, 2010
03:20 PM ET

Russia's disappointing show in the Vancouver Olympics got a frosty reception from the country's leaders with president Dmitry Medvedev calling for Olympic officials to quit.

Medvedev blamed the team's failures on "fat cat" bureaucrats who presumably had more of an interest in their own gold, silver and bronze than their athletes modest haul of 15 medals.

The president called for a complete overhaul of the country's sporting programs to halt the downhill slide ahead of the next winter olympics in 2014, which Russia is hosting in Sochi.

Russian athletes, trainers and sport officials meanwhile blamed bad luck, lousy weather, equipment failure, echoes of previous doping scandals, judges' bias and other factors for its dismal showing.

Are a nation's sports officials ultimately responsible for their athletes poor showing? And should they lose their jobs over it?

Posted by
Filed under:  Sport
soundoff (2 Responses)
  1. Marie

    If there is any kind of controversy in short-track speed skating, you can be sure the Koreans are involved. If there is any kind of controversy or scandal in figure skating, you can bet the Russians are involved. Some countries, after investing heavily in their athletes, are unable to admit when the playing field has widened and others are better. For example, Yevgeny Plushenko is an excellent skater. But emerging from retirement while the sport changed and the other skaters learned how to glean every point from the system did not yield Plushenko the gold he thinks he deserves, so must blame everything but himself. Just like women's figure skating is being dominated by Asian athletes with smaller frames who can jump higher, sports continually evolve. It is unfair for Russia to put so much pressure on its athletes, who try their best for a country that still has the mindset of a global power. With so many states breaking away, Russia no longer has the pool of athletes to choose from. Athletes bringing home the medals is certainly of great pride to a country, but it isn't everything.

    March 2, 2010 at 5:28 pm | Reply
  2. Pavel Kryuchkov

    Are a nation's sports officials ultimately responsible for their athletes poor showing? And should they lose their jobs over it?
    -of course not always a nation's sports officials are responsible for failures of athletes, because it depends on the different conditions like lack of talent, equipment failures or too much ballyhoo in the media etc., but for that what occured in russian national team we must blame our officials, cause instead of carrying out their duties they spent the whole time in Vancouver having good time in the russian house with the notorious russian show business celebrities

    March 2, 2010 at 7:59 pm | Reply

Post a comment


 

CNN welcomes a lively and courteous discussion as long as you follow the Rules of Conduct set forth in our Terms of Service. Comments are not pre-screened before they post. You agree that anything you post may be used, along with your name and profile picture, in accordance with our Privacy Policy and the license you have granted pursuant to our Terms of Service.