Tune in at 16:00 London, 19:00 UAE

Live from Abu Dhabi Connect the World takes you on a journey across continents, investigating the stories that are changing our world.

Live from Abu Dhabi Connect the World takes you on a journey across continents, investigating the stories that are changing our world.

Wednesday's Connector: Christopher Nolan

July 7th, 2010
05:18 PM ET

British-American film director and writer, Christopher Nolan is out with a new psychological thriller called "Inception", which some critics are saying could be one of his best movies yet.

Christopher Nolan is your Connector of the Day.

Christopher Nolan is your Connector of the Day.

Nolan has also directed other films including "Memento" and is credited with helping to revive the "Batman" movie franchise.

Born in July 1970, Nolan who is the son of a British father and an American mother grew up in both London and Chicago.

Nolan had an early interest in film-making techniques and even shot short movies with his father's camera and his toy soldiers.

The director's first feature film was "Following" in 1996 and was a generally considered a success by both critics and movie studios.

Nolan's next film, "Memento" was released in 2000 to critical success and was subsequently nominated for both a Golden Globe and Oscar.

However, Nolan may be best known for his role in reviving the "Batman" franchise .

Today, he is out with a new film starring Leonard di Caprio called "Inception."

Is global warming still a serious threat?

July 7th, 2010
01:17 PM ET

   

Has 'climategate' changed your opinion of global warming? (Getty/AFP)

CLARIFICATION: An earlier version of this blog post stated that: “Recent polling by Rasmussen Reports show that the number of people who believe global warming is a serious problem is on the decline.” The Rasmussen poll is actually intended to gauge opinion among likely U.S. voters, rather than the general population. This blog post has also been updated to make clear that the Rasmussen poll was conducted in April.

(CNN) Climate change scientists have been cleared of any wrong-doing after a seven month investigation unveiled that professor Phil Jones did not fudge data to try to silence skeptics.  

Muir Russell, who led the investigation, found that scientists at the climatic research unit at the University of East Anglia did not do anything to change or alter critical data and they still produced work in a "rigorous and honest" way.  

The controversy was sparked when years of e-mails between the scientists were released online and disseminated by climate change skeptics.  

The nay-sayers argued that the e-mails showed that years of research were manipulated to back up the theory of man-made climate change.  

While the inquiry may have given the all clear to the scientists, the controversy may have done more harm than good to the cause.  

A poll from April 2010 by Rasmussen Reports show that the number of likely voters who believe global warming is a serious problem is on the decline.  

The telephone survey found that 54 percent of people believe that climate change is a serious problem - that's down eight percentage points from a year ago.  

43 percent of those surveyed said that climate change is not a serious problem, including 21 percent of people who said it was not serious at all.We want to know what you think.  

Has the 'climategate' scandal changed your opinion of global warming? Do you still believe that it is a serious problem? Has concern for global warming taken a back seat to economic issues that many countries are face?  

Please leave your comments below and be sure to include where you're writing from.


Filed under:  General