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Live from Abu Dhabi Connect the World takes you on a journey across continents, investigating the stories that are changing our world.

Live from Abu Dhabi Connect the World takes you on a journey across continents, investigating the stories that are changing our world.

MH370 and the Future of Tracking Flights

April 7th, 2014
08:00 PM ET

The ongoing search for Malaysia Airlines flight 370 has been defined by false hope and impeded by both the weather and the sheer scale of the operation. In Monday's Connect the World with Becky Anderson live from Abu Dhabi, Becky interviewed the Chief of the International Air Transport Association (IATA) Tony Tyler about what the saga over missing Flight MH370 means for the future of tracking planes.


Filed under:  Analysis • Becky's Interviews • Breaking News • General • Malaysia
soundoff (One Response)
  1. Djinnjaha

    To avoid the long search for Flight MH370 from happening again:

    1. A device needs to be fitted to a commercial airliner that can not be switched off from within anywhere on the plane after take-off, is powered independently of the aircraft’s electrical system, is only switched on upon contact with water (both fresh and salt), and transmits to a satellite the co-ordinates (GPS and/or Lat & Long in degrees/minutes/seconds). This would give an all-important Starting Point for the search, right from the get-go.

    2. The “black box” locator beacon’s transmission range needs to be extended to further than the greatest depth of the ocean (perhaps to 50km ? ) so that they can be detected above the surface of the ocean, and first be detected by search aircraft.

    3. The battery-life of the “black box” locator beacons needs to be extended to 90-days minimum rather than the present 30 days.

    Finally, in an ideal world where expenditure is no object, the above needs to be retro-fitted to all commercial aircraft that have to fly over water.

    April 9, 2014 at 10:02 am | Reply

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