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Live from Abu Dhabi Connect the World takes you on a journey across continents, investigating the stories that are changing our world.

Live from Abu Dhabi Connect the World takes you on a journey across continents, investigating the stories that are changing our world.

Fighting female genital mutilation

February 7th, 2014
04:56 PM ET

The World Health Organization estimates that some 140 million women have been subjected to some form of female genital mutilation. A practice the UN calls a violation of human rights and gender equality. They say around 3 million girls face the risk of FGM every year and have declared February 6th the 'International Day of Zero Tolerance to Female Genital Mutilation'. To mark this day, Becky spoke to Naana Otoo-Oyortey from the Foundation for Women's Health Research and Development.

She identified various recurring problems when it comes to tackling this subject.

"There are women who don't even know that they've been through FGM, and that in itself is challenging because if you had it at a much younger age you may not recall when it happened, and you may not see yourself as different, you'd see yourself as normal."

There is also a common acceptance of this as a tradition within certain communities. "For a lot of people they are born into a culture where they see it also as part of their culture. We've had young girls in the UK who have said 'I wanted to go through it because I felt it was part of my culture'. Some girls who say 'I went on holiday and I insisted that I went through it'."

However, Otoo-Oyortey notes that progress is also being made, particularly in Europe, where the younger generation are challenging the status quo. "FGM affects primarily younger people, and in Africa even though you see that the campaign is mainly led by older women, we're seeing in Europe that there's much more engagement, primarily because young people have more access and have a better voice, and are able to understand their rights, and are able to engage on this issue."

 


Filed under:  Africa • Becky's Interviews • Girls Education • Health

Photographing them 'Before They Pass Away'

January 15th, 2014
03:26 PM ET

Photographer Jimmy Nelson has traveled all over the globe documenting remote places and people. In just three years he has visited thirty-five tribes, spending between one and three months with each.

Becky spoke to him about why he is so intent on documenting these tribes before they pass away.

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Filed under:  Africa • Becky's Interviews • Parting Shots • Video

Riek Machar: This is an uprising

December 27th, 2013
06:44 PM ET

East African leaders on Friday gave South Sudan's warring factions four days to lay down their arms after nearly two weeks of widening violence.

If they don't, the leaders of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development warned they'll "take action" to stop the conflict that the United Nations says has killed more than 1,000 and forced some 121,000 from their homes.

Max Foster speaks to former South Sudanese VP Riek Machar about the violence currently taking place in the young country.

Uganda official: Homosexuality a threat

December 27th, 2013
02:12 PM ET

Uganda has passed a law that makes being gay a crime punishable with up to life in prison.

The bill, which in its original form prescribed the death penalty for cases of "aggravated homosexuality" - for instance if someone is infected with HIV - reduced the penalty to life imprisonment before the vote.

Clauses that criminalize the "promotion" of homosexuality could cause activists and even doctors treating gay patients with HIV to face prison time.

 Max Foster talks to Ugandan gay rights activist Frank Mugisha.  

Qunu: Mandela's Resting Place

December 16th, 2013
05:05 PM ET

With military pomp and traditional rituals, South Africa buried Nelson Mandela on Sunday, the end of an exceptional journey for the prisoner turned president who transformed the nation.

Mandela was laid to rest in his childhood village of Qunu.

Tribal leaders clad in animal skins joined dignitaries in dark suits at the grave site overlooking the rolling green hills.

As pallbearers walked toward the site after a funeral ceremony, helicopters whizzed past dangling the national flag. Cannons fired a 21-gun salute, its echoes ringing over the quiet village.

Mandela's widow, Graca Machel, dabbed her eyes with a handkerchief as she watched the proceedings.

"Yours was truly a long walk to freedom. Now you have achieved the ultimate freedom in the bosom of God, your maker," an officiator at the grave site said.

Military pallbearers gently removed the South African flag that draped the coffin and handed it to President Jacob Zuma, who gave it to Mandela's family.

At the request of the family, the lowering of the casket was closed to the media.

We take a look at Qunu, the place Mandela was buried and which was so important to him.

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Filed under:  Africa • Video
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